CERI finds genotoxicity risk from polystyrene oligomers ‘very low’

Recently a team from Japan's Chemicals Evaluation and Research Institute (CERI) has shown there is a minimal threat of genotoxicity from oligomers migrating from polystyrene food contact materials.

Recently a team from Japan's Chemicals Evaluation and Research Institute (CERI) has shown there is a minimal threat of genotoxicity from oligomers migrating from polystyrene food contact materials.

The researchers extracted styrene oligomers from the popular packaging plastic and exposed them to five strains of bacteria in an Ames test. All five subject samples were found to be 'negative both in the presence or absence of metabolic activation.'

The same result was found in a parallel test in which the lung cells of hamsters were exposed to the oligomers.
This leads the CERI investigators to conclude 'that the risk of the genotoxicity of styrene oligomers that migrate from polystyrene food packaging into food is very low.'

The study was published as the paper Genotoxicity of styrene oligomers extracted from polystyrene intended for use in contact with food on 15 November in the journal Toxicology Reports.

The testing was carried out using stimulants recommended by both the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Food Safety Agency.


This article comes from Food Contact World, which provides exclusive news and analysis on developments in food contact material , markets, and technologies.

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