Study identifies 54 hazardous chemicals in EU food packages

A study in the journal Food Additives & Contaminants: Part A has identified 175 chemicals that have been identified as hazardous on official lists of approved food contact materials...

A study in the journal Food Additives & Contaminants: Part A has identified 175 chemicals that have been identified as hazardous on official lists of approved food contact materials.

The results were published on 7 July 2014.

The study's authors have suggested that European authorities should act on their findings and ensure 'that substances declared SVHCs (substances of very high concern) under [the REACH Regulation 1907/2006] are also restricted under the FCM Regulation.'

The methodology employed was to cross-reference the Substitute it Now (SIN) list of known or suspected hazardous chemicals complied by Swedish NGO Chemsec against official registers of food contact materials. For plastic materials the positive list in the EU's Regulation 10/2011 was used. For non-plastic materials the database published by the European Food Safety Agency in 2011 was employed. A US perspective was given by also examining the database of approved food contact materials compiled by the Pew Trust in 2011.

In total it was found that 175 chemicals of concern that have been found to be carcinogenic, mutagenic or toxic to human reproductivity (CRT); persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic (PBT); very persistent and very bioaccumulative (vPvB); or potential endocrine disruptors; were found on at least one of the three lists.

Overall 54 of the Sin List substances were present on one of both of the two European lists. This included four priority substances that have been identified as priorities for a phase out in the EU, through addition to Annex XIV of the REACH Regulation. A further 15 are candidates for this process having been identified as SVHCs.

 

 

This article comes from Food Contact World, which provides exclusive news and analysis on developments in food contact material , markets, and technologies.

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